According to Le Blon, three-color printing could reproduce "all the degrees of lights and shades" found in the flesh tones. Lifelike modeling of skin tones was considered the most difficult aspect of reproduction. Source: From Coloritto, or the Harmony of Coloring in Painting . . . (London, n.d. [1725]), plate 3, after page 27.

From The creation of color in eighteenth-century Europe by Sarah Lowengard

Creator(s)
Subjects
  • European: 1400-1800
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According to Le Blon, three-color printing could reproduce "all the degrees of lights and shades" found in the flesh tones. Lifelike modeling of skin tones was considered the most difficult aspect of reproduction. Source: From Coloritto, or the Harmony of Coloring in Painting . . . (London, n.d. [1725]), plate 3, after page 27.
  • Jacob Christoph Le Blon, Head of a woman, 1725. According to Le Blon, three-color printing could reproduce "all the degrees of lights and shades" found in the flesh tones. Lifelike modeling of skin tones was considered the most difficult aspect of reproduction. Source: From Coloritto, or the Harmony of Coloring in Painting . . . (London, n.d. [1725]), plate 3, after page 27.