• Excerpts from video interviews with Anne Gere and Naomi Silver about key findings and takeaways for students

Transcript

  • WEBVTT

    1
    00:00:15.194 --> 00:00:19.458
    So I'm Anne Ruggles Gere, and
    I am Director of the Sweetland Center for

    2
    00:00:19.458 --> 00:00:20.105
    Writing.

    3
    00:00:20.105 --> 00:00:24.325
    I have been director since 2008, and

    4
    00:00:24.325 --> 00:00:29.835
    I bring a background of
    a career in writing studies.

    5
    00:00:29.835 --> 00:00:36.630
    I've been a professor for
    around 40 years, and all of that has been

    6
    00:00:36.630 --> 00:00:41.140
    in the area of rhetoric and composition,
    more commonly now called writing studies.

    7
    00:00:42.620 --> 00:00:48.703
    And I'm Naomi Silver, I'm the Associate
    Director of the Sweetland Center for

    8
    00:00:48.703 --> 00:00:52.969
    Writing and
    I've been in that role since 2007, and

    9
    00:00:52.969 --> 00:00:56.720
    I bring a background in teaching for
    a while now.

    10
    00:01:02.058 --> 00:01:06.560
    Well, I think among the surprising things for

    11
    00:01:06.560 --> 00:01:12.565
    me were first of all,
    how important students' desires are.

    12
    00:01:12.565 --> 00:01:19.860
    That they come to the university with
    things that they want to accomplish.

    13
    00:01:19.860 --> 00:01:24.240
    And I'm not sure that as professors
    we're as aware of that, and

    14
    00:01:24.240 --> 00:01:29.730
    it's very clear that in many cases,
    students have really

    15
    00:01:29.730 --> 00:01:33.720
    intentional agendas that
    they are following.

    16
    00:01:33.720 --> 00:01:39.030
    And they're making choices about
    their development as writers

    17
    00:01:39.030 --> 00:01:42.000
    based on what they want to accomplish.

    18
    00:01:42.000 --> 00:01:47.083
    And I don't think I had given students
    enough credit, if you will, for

    19
    00:01:47.083 --> 00:01:52.519
    that kind of careful thinking about
    who they wanted to become as writers,

    20
    00:01:52.519 --> 00:01:55.780
    and that's perhaps the biggest surprise.

    21
    00:02:01.379 --> 00:02:06.295
    I would say one of them is
    the importance of the social

    22
    00:02:06.295 --> 00:02:11.230
    dimension of writing that we saw again,
    and again.

    23
    00:02:12.280 --> 00:02:16.430
    Certainly, the whole notion
    of interaction with peers,

    24
    00:02:16.430 --> 00:02:20.070
    with instructors makes
    an enormous difference.

    25
    00:02:20.070 --> 00:02:24.430
    This was something that we saw over,
    and over again that students talked

    26
    00:02:24.430 --> 00:02:28.970
    in some cases quite explicitly
    about how writing enabled them

    27
    00:02:28.970 --> 00:02:34.150
    to work through non-academic issues,
    as well as academic ones.

    28
    00:02:34.150 --> 00:02:41.270
    The more that they can learn to become
    aware of what they're doing as they engage

    29
    00:02:41.270 --> 00:02:46.500
    in the various writing processes that they
    engage in, the more successful they'll be.

    30
    00:02:46.500 --> 00:02:49.640
    The more quickly they'll
    develop as writers, but also,

    31
    00:02:49.640 --> 00:02:54.540
    I think the more they'll gain from the
    act of writing, the more they'll enjoy it.

    32
    00:02:54.540 --> 00:02:58.628
    The more that it will become part of
    their conception of who they are, and

    33
    00:02:58.628 --> 00:03:02.928
    how they act in the world, as opposed to
    just a thing that they do for school.

    34
    00:03:08.610 --> 00:03:13.261
    I think the big take away
    that first occurs to me,

    35
    00:03:13.261 --> 00:03:17.347
    is that students should
    feel free to assert

    36
    00:03:17.347 --> 00:03:22.119
    their right to have their
    own agendas as writers.

    37
    00:03:22.119 --> 00:03:26.749
    And to do exactly what
    we found students doing,

    38
    00:03:26.749 --> 00:03:30.802
    making choices that in some cases subvert

    39
    00:03:30.802 --> 00:03:36.540
    the curricular intentions
    that they are embedded in.

    40
    00:03:36.540 --> 00:03:41.446
    Students benefit from being given
    ample opportunities to reflect on what

    41
    00:03:41.446 --> 00:03:45.953
    they have done, and what they're
    learning in regard to feedback,

    42
    00:03:45.953 --> 00:03:48.659
    how they're choosing to use feedback.

    43
    00:03:48.659 --> 00:03:54.502
    So the more that instructors can
    help students to think of themselves

    44
    00:03:54.502 --> 00:04:01.060
    as being empowered to make choices,
    both in their topics, in their genres.

    45
    00:04:01.060 --> 00:04:06.085
    And in the ways that they make use
    of what's being offered to them in

    46
    00:04:06.085 --> 00:04:11.470
    the classroom, the more that the students
    will be able to find paths for

    47
    00:04:11.470 --> 00:04:13.379
    their own development.

Key findings and takeaways of the study for students

From Developing Writers in Higher Education: A Longitudinal Study by Anne Ruggles Gere, Editor

Info

Creator(s)
Creator Role
Contributor(s)
Subjects
  • Composition
  • Education:Higher Education
  • Writing
  • Digital Projects
Related Section
Keywords
Language
Citable Link