A landdag ceremony usually ended with a feast, invariably described as an occasion of “great mirth and gaiety,” in which Dutchmen and aborigines alike ate, drank, and danced “until deep in the night.” In this drawing, aboriginal elders are seated at their places along a long table as Dutchmen look on. Farther to the right two Europeans greet each other. Detail from Landdag Ceremony on Taiwan, drawing by Caspar Schmalkalden. Used by permission of the Gotha Research Library (Gotha Forschungsbibliotek) (finding aid: Chart. B 533, fos. 288v-299).

From How Taiwan became Chinese: Dutch, Spanish, and Han colonization in the seventeenth century by Tonio Andrade

Subjects
  • Asian: China and Inner Asia
Citable Link
  • Elders Dining at a Landdag, c. 1652 A landdag ceremony usually ended with a feast, invariably described as an occasion of “great mirth and gaiety,” in which Dutchmen and aborigines alike ate, drank, and danced “until deep in the night.” In this drawing, aboriginal elders are seated at their places along a long table as Dutchmen look on. Farther to the right two Europeans greet each other. Detail from Landdag Ceremony on Taiwan, drawing by Caspar Schmalkalden. Used by permission of the Gotha Research Library (Gotha Forschungsbibliotek) (finding aid: Chart. B 533, fos. 288v-299).