This painting from 1746 nicely illustrates the sexual division of labor in traditional aboriginal villages. On the left two men return from the hunt. To the right a group of women husks rice (舂米) with wooden mortar and pestle (以大木為臼、直木為杵). Women also grew the rice, thereby contributing the largest share of calories to the village's sustenance. Note the house is on stilts, a hallmark of traditional Austronesian architecture throughout Southeast Asia and the Pacific. Image is from the Fan she cai feng tu (番社采風圖 Genre Paintings of Taiwan Aborigines), used by permission of the Academia Sinica Institute of History and Phililogy.

From How Taiwan became Chinese: Dutch, Spanish, and Han colonization in the seventeenth century by Tonio Andrade

Subjects
  • Asian: China and Inner Asia
Citable Link
  • Husking Rice (舂米), 1746 This painting from 1746 nicely illustrates the sexual division of labor in traditional aboriginal villages. On the left two men return from the hunt. To the right a group of women husks rice (舂米) with wooden mortar and pestle (以大木為臼、直木為杵). Women also grew the rice, thereby contributing the largest share of calories to the village's sustenance. Note the house is on stilts, a hallmark of traditional Austronesian architecture throughout Southeast Asia and the Pacific. Image is from the Fan she cai feng tu (番社采風圖 Genre Paintings of Taiwan Aborigines), used by permission of the Academia Sinica Institute of History and Phililogy.