The "train dance" in Mon Paris. The "train" in the 1927 production of Mon Paris consists of a row of twenty-three actors, legs extended, linked hand on elbow so as to resemble the drivers connecting the wheels of a chugging steam engine (and wheels decorate the legs of their white trousers). Kushida, the protagonist, is clutching a carpet bag and umbrella in his left hand and grasping the right shoulder of the last "wheel" with his right as he leaves Marseilles for Paris. The train reappears in the last scene when Kushida reminds the audience that he has overseen their safe arrival in Paris and bids them good cheer (Waga pari yo 1927:30-31). From Hashimoto (1988:18).

From Takarazuka: sexual politics and popular culture in modern Japan by Jennifer Robertson

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  • Women's Studies
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  • Figure 14. The "train dance" in Mon Paris. The "train" in the 1927 production of Mon Paris consists of a row of twenty-three actors, legs extended, linked hand on elbow so as to resemble the drivers connecting the wheels of a chugging steam engine (and wheels decorate the legs of their white trousers). Kushida, the protagonist, is clutching a carpet bag and umbrella in his left hand and grasping the right shoulder of the last "wheel" with his right as he leaves Marseilles for Paris. The train reappears in the last scene when Kushida reminds the audience that he has overseen their safe arrival in Paris and bids them good cheer (Waga pari yo 1927:30-31). From Hashimoto (1988:18).