The representation of the imperial arms in A Copye of a Letter contayning certayne newes, and the Articles or requestes of the Devonshyre & Cornyshe rebelles, printed by John Day and William Seres in 1549. Day borrowed the block from the king's printer Richard Grafton, who had used it in 1547 in James Henrisoun's Exhortation to the Scotts. The block appears to predate the break from Rome (it features Catherine of Aragon's symbol of the pomegranate), and it may have encouraged Day to produce his own, more sophisticated representation of Edward's imperial kingship in 1549.

From Kingship and politics in the reign of Edward VI by Stephen Alford

Creator(s)
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  • European: 400-1400
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  • Fig. 5 The representation of the imperial arms in A Copye of a Letter contayning certayne newes, and the Articles or requestes of the Devonshyre & Cornyshe rebelles, printed by John Day and William Seres in 1549. Day borrowed the block from the king's printer Richard Grafton, who had used it in 1547 in James Henrisoun's Exhortation to the Scotts. The block appears to predate the break from Rome (it features Catherine of Aragon's symbol of the pomegranate), and it may have encouraged Day to produce his own, more sophisticated representation of Edward's imperial kingship in 1549.