On the 19th of September, 1772, Barbara Vallinas found herself sick in bed, desperate, and suffering horrible agonies. The doctor was certain there was little hope for recovery, but as he began to give her something to help her die comfortably, she made a sudden recovery because others in the house had called upon San Juan Nepomuseno and San Rafael to save her. The moment the image of San Juan Nepomuseno was placed on her chest “she was able to talk, something she had not done in three days, and she was so revived that the next day she could go out and warm herself in the sun.

From Pestilence and headcolds: encountering illness in colonial Mexico by Sherry Fields

Creator(s)
Subjects
  • Latin American
Citable Link
  • Ex-voto to San Juan Nepomuseno and San Rafael. On the 19th of September, 1772, Barbara Vallinas found herself sick in bed, desperate, and suffering horrible agonies. The doctor was certain there was little hope for recovery, but as he began to give her something to help her die comfortably, she made a sudden recovery because others in the house had called upon San Juan Nepomuseno and San Rafael to save her. The moment the image of San Juan Nepomuseno was placed on her chest “she was able to talk, something she had not done in three days, and she was so revived that the next day she could go out and warm herself in the sun.