"Ah! Je l'avais bien dit: Tans va la cruche a l'eau qu'enfin elle s'emplit." The figure escorting Beaumarchais carries a paper that reads "A Messieurs de Saint-Lazare, 7 mars 1785," and the figure representing Bazile exclaims, "Ah! Je l'avais bien dit, tant va la cruche á l'eau qu'á la fin elle se casse." In the play, Figaro queries Bazile if he know the end of the proverb, and Bazile answers correctly "elle s'emplit" (V.xi). [BN-Éstampes, Collection Hennin 10,039.]

From A field of honor: writers, court culture and public theater in French literary life from Racine to the Revolution by Gregory S. Brown

Creator(s)
Subjects
  • European: 1400-1800
Citable Link
"Ah! Je l'avais bien dit: Tans va la cruche a l'eau qu'enfin elle s'emplit." The figure escorting Beaumarchais carries a paper that reads "A Messieurs de Saint-Lazare, 7 mars 1785," and the figure representing Bazile exclaims, "Ah! Je l'avais bien dit, tant va la cruche á l'eau qu'á la fin elle se casse." In the play, Figaro queries Bazile if he know the end of the proverb, and Bazile answers correctly "elle s'emplit" (V.xi). [BN-Éstampes, Collection Hennin 10,039.]
  • "Ah! Je l'avais bien dit: Tans va la cruche a l'eau qu'enfin elle s'emplit." The figure escorting Beaumarchais carries a paper that reads "A Messieurs de Saint-Lazare, 7 mars 1785," and the figure representing Bazile exclaims, "Ah! Je l'avais bien dit, tant va la cruche á l'eau qu'á la fin elle se casse." In the play, Figaro queries Bazile if he know the end of the proverb, and Bazile answers correctly "elle s'emplit" (V.xi). [BN-Éstampes, Collection Hennin 10,039.]