Most aborigines gained the lion's share of protein from the deer hunt, but for some villages, fishing was also important. This painting shows three different methods aborigines used to catch fish. In the foreground, one aborigine aims a bow, while his companion uses a spear. The two in the background use wicker baskets as nets. Image is from the Fan she cai feng tu (番社采風圖 Genre Paintings of Taiwan Aborigines), used by permission of the Academia Sinica Institute of History and Phililogy. Source: Academia Sinica Institute of History and Philology

From How Taiwan became Chinese: Dutch, Spanish, and Han colonization in the seventeenth century by Tonio Andrade

Subjects
  • Asian: China and Inner Asia
Citable Link
  • Catching Fish (捕魚), 1746 Most aborigines gained the lion's share of protein from the deer hunt, but for some villages, fishing was also important. This painting shows three different methods aborigines used to catch fish. In the foreground, one aborigine aims a bow, while his companion uses a spear. The two in the background use wicker baskets as nets. Image is from the Fan she cai feng tu (番社采風圖 Genre Paintings of Taiwan Aborigines), used by permission of the Academia Sinica Institute of History and Phililogy. Source: Academia Sinica Institute of History and Philology