Source: The London Times, The Times History of the War: The Battlefield of Europe, New York, NY: Woodward and Van Slyke, 1915, 86–87.

From Pursuit of an "unparalleled opportunity": American YMCA and prisoner of war diplomacy among the Central Power nations during World War I, 1914-1923 by Kenneth Steuer

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  • American: 1900-present
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  • GERMAN ARMY CORPS - The German Empire was divided into twenty-four army corps districts before World War I as illustrated by this map. The headquarters of each army corps, identified by capital letters over the Roman numerals of specific corps, was responsible for military activity within its assigned region. During peacetime, the army corps command trained new recruits, supported reserve units, and maintained military preparedness. Once war was declared, the army corps mobilized the forces under their command, mustered reserve units, and defended fortresses within their regions. As Allied prisoners of war entered the Germany, these army corps headquarters established POW facilities, organized guard units, and created a logistical system to support prison camp operations. Most of the army corps of the German Army were part of the Royal Prussian Army (eighteen), but three army corps reported to the Royal Bavarian Army, two represented the Royal Saxon Army, and one was part of the Royal Württemberg Army. Source: The London Times, The Times History of the War: The Battlefield of Europe, New York, NY: Woodward and Van Slyke, 1915, 86–87.