Dan's thoughts on feedback

From Developing Writers in Higher Education: A Longitudinal Study by Anne Ruggles Gere, Editor

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  • Education:Higher Education
  • Digital Projects
  • Composition
  • Writing
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  • This animation showcases Dan, who learns to welcome feedback from an initial uncritical resistance to it.

Transcript

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    Writing became synonymous with opinions,
    and

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    it only takes a few bad opinions
    to shake my confidence.

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    Dan was unsure who to trust when
    getting feedback on his writing from his

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    classmates.

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    He knew that asking other people for
    their opinions mattered, but

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    too often the feedback focused on
    something he wasn't interested in, or

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    focused on what was wrong with
    his writing, not what was right.

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    It made it hard for

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    him to bind to the peer response exercises
    in his first year writing course.

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    He also made it clear that he wanted to
    be in control of his writing experience.

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    No one gets to determine my
    writing process except myself.

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    Asking others for
    input represented a loss of control, and

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    a potential disregard of the effort
    he put into his writing.

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    Even after four years of college,
    Dan had moved only a little.

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    I'd rather go to the instructor for
    feedback.

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    I don't always take away
    a ton from peer review.

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    His instructors let him know that his
    classmates would be the ultimate source of

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    feedback for him, but he resisted,

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    because the feedback he got wasn't
    about the questions he had.

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    When he had to put his work on
    the Internet, in classes, and

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    as a student journalist, he realized that
    anyone could offer him feedback, and

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    hearing from his audience made him
    look with new eyes at his own writing.

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    That lesson changed him.

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    He couldn't see it at the time,
    but his attitude shifted,

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    and he was open to new
    possibilities in peer review.

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    After graduating, Dan took a job
    as the social media specialist for

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    a professional sports team.

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    Twitter, Instagram, and Snapchat became
    his job, and the feedback rolled in,

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    but Dan admits that-
    Because I have that experience opening

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    myself up to feedback I'm
    ready to handle it today.

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    The more voices you have giving
    you feedback, the more you learn.

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    Dan explains in his own words a little
    bit more about how he works with writing

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    and feedback now.