Pont included samples from his experiments with the description of his new coloring processes. The first three cloths were dyed with cochineal in solutions of potash and tin. The remaining samples were second or third strikes, dyeins made from a cochineal bath already used. Urine (an alkaline source often used to degrease wool) and a tin solution were added to dye the wool fibers; the cloths were treated with sulfuric acid but no tin, and with tin salts and copper nitrate added to the bath. The results were more consistently red than second strikes generally produced.

From The creation of color in eighteenth-century Europe by Sarah Lowengard

Creator(s)
Subjects
  • European: 1400-1800
Citable Link
  • Jean-Baptiste Pont, Mémoire to Macquer and de Montaran, 2 October 1782. Pont included samples from his experiments with the description of his new coloring processes. The first three cloths were dyed with cochineal in solutions of potash and tin. The remaining samples were second or third strikes, dyeins made from a cochineal bath already used. Urine (an alkaline source often used to degrease wool) and a tin solution were added to dye the wool fibers; the cloths were treated with sulfuric acid but no tin, and with tin salts and copper nitrate added to the bath. The results were more consistently red than second strikes generally produced.