As evident from the marginalia of medieval manuscripts, the metaphor of concatenation was not limited to images of forged metal links; it included hunting, fishing, and more digestible rhetorical figures, such as enlinked pretzels. Drawn by Amelia Amelia after marginalia in The Hours of Catherine of Cleves.

From Architecture and memory: the Renaissance studioli of Federico de Montefeltro by Robert Kirkbride

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  • Architectural History
Citable Link
As evident from the marginalia of medieval manuscripts, the metaphor of concatenation was not limited to images of forged metal links; it included hunting, fishing, and more digestible rhetorical figures, such as enlinked pretzels. Drawn by Amelia Amelia after marginalia in The Hours of Catherine of Cleves.
  • Fig. 4.37. As evident from the marginalia of medieval manuscripts, the metaphor of concatenation was not limited to images of forged metal links; it included hunting, fishing, and more digestible rhetorical figures, such as enlinked pretzels. Drawn by Amelia Amelia after marginalia in The Hours of Catherine of Cleves.