Jacob Epstein, "The Spirit of the Ghetto" (frontispiece for Hutchins Hapgood, The Spirit of the Ghetto: Studies of the Jewish Quarter of New York [1902; reprint, New York: Schocken, 1965]; image from the collection of the Tamiment-Wagner Labor Archives, New York University). The drawing captures the way Jewish workers talked about their labor in the sweatshop. Epstein alludes to the abominable conditions of labor in the sweatshops, not by drawing a cramped, filthy space, but by focusing on the deformed, obviously Jewish tailor's body. The conditions of work are etched on the male worker's enfeebled frame.

From Sweated work, weak bodies: anti-sweatshop campaigns and languages of labor by Daniel E. Bender

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  • American: General & Multiperiod
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  • Figure 2 Jacob Epstein, "The Spirit of the Ghetto" (frontispiece for Hutchins Hapgood, The Spirit of the Ghetto: Studies of the Jewish Quarter of New York [1902; reprint, New York: Schocken, 1965]; image from the collection of the Tamiment-Wagner Labor Archives, New York University). The drawing captures the way Jewish workers talked about their labor in the sweatshop. Epstein alludes to the abominable conditions of labor in the sweatshops, not by drawing a cramped, filthy space, but by focusing on the deformed, obviously Jewish tailor's body. The conditions of work are etched on the male worker's enfeebled frame.