Designed for the Earl of Coventry by Robert Adam, the room features walls lined with tapestries and similar-looking upholstery. A novel aspect is the continuous tapestry on all four walls, in effect a pictorial wall covering rather than a framed, painting-like tapestry. The scenes in the cartouches were designed by Boucher; the tapestries woven in Jacques Nielson's atelier at Gobelins. "Aux alentours" (with borders) refers to the production technique, whereby a detailed scene was fit into a plainer, more quickly executed surrounding.

From The creation of color in eighteenth-century Europe by Sarah Lowengard

Creator(s)
Subjects
  • European: 1400-1800
Citable Link
  • "Boucher aux Alentours," Croome Court Tapestry Room Interior, 1758-67, installed by 1771. Designed for the Earl of Coventry by Robert Adam, the room features walls lined with tapestries and similar-looking upholstery. A novel aspect is the continuous tapestry on all four walls, in effect a pictorial wall covering rather than a framed, painting-like tapestry. The scenes in the cartouches were designed by Boucher; the tapestries woven in Jacques Nielson's atelier at Gobelins. "Aux alentours" (with borders) refers to the production technique, whereby a detailed scene was fit into a plainer, more quickly executed surrounding.