• This video illustrates translation moments at Knightly Latino News

Transcript

  • WEBVTT

    00:00:00.000 --> 00:00:03.070
    [Camilla speaking Spanish]
    Hello everyone. Welcome to Knightly Latino.

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    My name is Camilla Hernandez,

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    and these are the latest happenings
    for this week.

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    [Ana speaking in English]
    I don’t want to do this in Spanish.

    00:00:13.280 --> 00:00:14.147 align:middle line:79% position:17% size:35%
    [Student speaking in Spanish]
    Go ahead, do it in English.

    00:00:14.214 --> 00:00:16.750 align:middle line:79% position:19% size:30%
    [Ana speaking in English]
    Thanks. OK, so…

    00:00:19.419 --> 00:00:25.626 align:middle line:74% position:16% size:38%
    [Ana speaking in English]
    I grew up speaking only Spanish,
    but the system was designed to,

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    instead of helping me
    embrace my second language,

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    or my first language, they were
    like "no, you don’t do that here,

    00:00:32.065 --> 00:00:35.569 align:middle line:79% position:17% size:35%
    you don’t speak those
    types of words around here.”

    00:00:37.537 --> 00:00:40.207 align:middle line:74% position:21% size:53%
    [Knightly student mixing Spanish and English]
    So, you have to take into consideration
    all those words

    00:00:40.274 --> 00:00:44.144 align:middle line:79% position:16% size:37%
    words that are the same,
    but that have so many meanings.

    00:00:44.211 --> 00:00:47.681 align:middle line:79% position:19% size:48%
    That doesn’t exist in English. It’s just
    one word for everything and that’s it.

    00:00:47.748 --> 00:00:51.000 align:middle line:79% position:22% size:55%
    And in Spanish you have this word but you also
    have all these other words that you can use.

    00:00:52.853 --> 00:01:00.928 align:middle line:79% position:20% size:29%
    [Katie speaking English]

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    Let’s see, let me think. Let me start over.

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    I think I’m thinking in Spanish.

    00:01:06.633 --> 00:01:07.935 align:middle line:79% position:17% size:35%
    [Laura speaking English]
    You can talk in Spanish, too.

    00:01:08.001 --> 00:01:09.136 align:middle line:79% position:24% size:18%
    -Oh, yeah?
    -Yeah, you can.

    00:01:11.905 --> 00:01:16.743 align:middle line:74% position:16% size:39%
    [Katie speaking Spanish]
    Ok, my goal is to be able to take
    this class to the next level,

    00:01:16.810 --> 00:01:21.014 align:middle line:79% position:18% size:46%
    so that it can compete with the courses
    we already have in English,

    00:01:21.081 --> 00:01:22.582 align:middle line:85% position:21% size:25%
    in news specifically.

    00:01:22.649 --> 00:01:25.585 align:middle line:79% position:16% size:38%
    In addition, I hope this becomes
    one of many courses

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    that we present to the University and
    to students so that students get a chance

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    to learn more about communication more broadly,

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    not only in news broadcasting, so that they
    learn how this is done here in the United States,

    00:01:36.129 --> 00:01:39.232 align:middle line:79% position:16% size:39%
    and also how this compares
    to what we have in Latin America.

    00:01:39.299 --> 00:01:43.070 align:middle line:79% position:16% size:37%
    I think this is very important,
    because during these times,

    00:01:43.136 --> 00:01:46.340 align:middle line:79% position:20% size:29%
    with the internet,
    the world is very small.

    00:01:46.406 --> 00:01:51.311 align:middle line:79% position:18% size:45%
    And they have to be, they have to have
    more value as professionals,

    00:01:51.378 --> 00:01:54.481 align:middle line:79% position:18% size:46%
    and I think this is what will help them
    reach that goal.

    00:01:56.283 --> 00:01:57.651 align:middle line:79% position:18% size:33%
    [Brigitte speaking English]
    I don't necessarily fit...

    00:01:57.718 --> 00:02:02.122 align:middle line:79% position:19% size:48%
    and some people might think, oh, you’re
    translating from English to Spanish.

    00:02:02.189 --> 00:02:04.424 align:middle line:79% position:16% size:38%
    You might be a little bit slow,
    or you just don’t understand it.

    00:02:04.491 --> 00:02:07.561 align:middle line:79% position:19% size:30%
    But, in reality it’s just
    so much complex brainwork

    00:02:07.627 --> 00:02:11.298 align:middle line:79% position:16% size:39%
    and I think through doing these
    translations and these recordings

    00:02:11.365 --> 00:02:13.033 align:middle line:79% position:20% size:28%
    you can really
    see how the mind works.

    00:02:14.001 --> 00:02:16.436 align:middle line:79% position:21% size:53%
    [Tamara speaking English] Ok, I’m gonna
    start over because I was thinking in English.

    00:02:18.405 --> 00:02:19.806 align:middle line:85% position:20% size:28%
    My name is Tamara Mino,

    00:02:19.873 --> 00:02:23.710 align:middle line:79% position:16% size:39%
    I’m a human communication major
    minoring in broadcast journalism.

    00:02:23.777 --> 00:02:27.447 align:middle line:79% position:18% size:44%
    [Katie speaking English]
    Some of them come from Latin America,

    00:02:27.514 --> 00:02:29.483 align:middle line:85% position:17% size:35%
    and some of them are US-born,

    00:02:29.549 --> 00:02:33.787 align:middle line:79% position:21% size:52%
    but they want to work in both markets or
    they want to make themselves more marketable

    00:02:33.854 --> 00:02:36.089 align:middle line:85% position:18% size:44%
    by working in English and in Spanish.

    00:02:38.125 --> 00:02:40.227 align:middle line:79% position:20% size:50%
    [knightly latino student speaking Spanish]
    We’re really doing the work

    00:02:40.293 --> 00:02:42.929 align:middle line:85% position:17% size:43%
    that we want to do when we graduate.

    00:02:42.996 --> 00:02:45.098 align:middle line:85% position:18% size:45%
    This allows us to have real experience

    00:02:45.165 --> 00:02:47.267 align:middle line:85% position:19% size:48%
    so that when we graduate we can get jobs

    00:02:47.334 --> 00:02:50.404 align:middle line:79% position:16% size:39%
    that require us to use our skills
    in both English and Spanish.

    00:02:52.639 --> 00:02:54.274 align:middle line:79% position:19% size:31%
    [Camilla speaking Spanish]
    Thank you for joining us.

    00:02:54.341 --> 00:02:56.877 align:middle line:79% position:19% size:31%
    This is Camilla Hernandez,
    from Knightly Latino.

Translation

  • Video 1. Translation Moments at Knightly Latino News

    [The video opens with a clip from a Knightly Latino broadcast. A female reporter for Knightly Latino appears on screen. Her name is listed on screen as “Camilla Hernandez”.]

    CAMILLA: Hola a todos. Bienvenidos a Knightly Latino. Mi nombre es Camilla Hernandez, y estos son los últimos acontecimientos de esta semana.

    Hello everyone. Welcome to Knightly Latino. My name is Camilla Hernandez, and these are the latest happenings for this week.

    [A title slide reads “Defining translation at Knightly Latino. The next scene shows Knightly Latino students sitting around a table. One student, Ana, speaks up during the meeting.]

    ANA: I don’t want to do this in Spanish

    Ya no quiero hablar en Español.

    STUDENT: Go ahead, do it in English

    Si, hazlo en Ingles

    ANA: OK, so…

    Ok, entonces…

    [A title screen reads “Translation=Experience,” “La traducción=Experiencia.” Ana comes back on screen during the Knightly Latino meeting.]

    ANA: I grew up speaking only Spanish, but the system was designed to, instead of helping me embrace my second language, or my first language, they were like ‘no, you don’t do that here, you don’t speak those types of words around here.’

    Yo crecí hablando solo el español, pero el sistema fue diseñado para, en vez de animarme a usar mi primer idioma, a decirme que ‘no, ese idioma no se usa acá.’

    [A title screen reads “La traducción=Negociación,” “Translation=Negotiation.” Another Knightly Latino student comes on screen discussing her language-learning experience.]

    KNIGHTLY STUDENT: Entonces, you have to take into consideration todas esas palabras que son lo mismo, pero que tienen tantos significados [makes circular gestures with her hands]. Eso en Ingles no existe. Es una palabra para todo y ya. Y en español está esta [points to her water bottle] y también están todas esas otras que puedes usar [makes circular gestures].

    And so, tienes que tomar en cuenta all those words that are the same, but that have so many meanings. That doesn’t exist in English. It’s just one word for everything and that’s it. And that doesn’t exist in English; it’s just one word for everything and that’s it. And in Spanish you have this word but you also have all these other words that you can use.

    [In the next scene, the director of Knightly Latino, Katie Coronado, sits in her office during an interview. At first, she seems unsure of her answer, but after being told by Laura that she can provide answers in Spanish, Katie becomes more confident and speaks firmly.]

    KATIE: Let’s see, let me think. Let me start over.

    A ver, déjame pensar. Déjame empezar de nuevo.

    KATIE: I think I’m thinking in Spanish.

    Creo que estoy pensando en español.

    LAURA: You can talk in Spanish, too.

    Puedes hablar en español también.

    KATIE: Oh yeah?

    O, sí?

    LAURA: Yeah

    KATIE: Ok, mi meta es poder llevar a esta clase al próximo nivel, para que pueda competir con las clases que hay en Ingles, las que se tratan de noticias específicamente. A demás de eso, quiero que esta sea la primera de muchas clases que vamos a presentarle aquí a la Universidad y a los estudiantes para que tengan la oportunidad de aprender más sobre los medios de comunicación en general, no solamente en noticias, como se hace aquí en los Estados Unidos, y entonces como se compara a lo que tenemos en Latino América. Creo que eso es sumamente importante porque en estos momentos ya, con el internet, el mundo es muy muy pequeño. Y ellos tienen que ser, que tener más valor como profesionales, y creo que esto es lo que los va llevar a cumplir esa meta.

    Ok, my goal is to be able to take this class to the next level, so that it can compete with the courses we already have in English, in news specifically. In addition, I hope this becomes one of many courses that we present to the University and to students so that students get a chance to learn more about communication more broadly, not only in news broadcasting, so that they learn how this is done here in the United States, and also how this compares to what we have in Latin America. I think this is very important, because during these times, with the internet, the world is very small. And they have to be, they have to have more value as professionals, and I think this is what will help them reach that goal.

    [A title screen reads “Translation= ‘Brain Work.’” Another Knightly Latino student, Brigitte, comes on screen discussing her experiences with translation.]

    BRIGITTE: Some people might think, ‘oh, you’re translating from English to Spanish. You might be a little bit slow, or you just don’t understand it.' But, in reality it’s [translation is] just so much complex brainwork and I think through doing these translations and these recordings you can really see how the mind works.

    Algunas personas pueden pensar, ‘Oh, estas traduciendo, debes ser un poco lento, es que no entiendes.’ Pero en realidad, la traducción es un trabajo cerebral muy complicado y yo creo que viendo el proceso de la traducción nos permite ver como funciona el cerebro.

    [Another Knightly Latino student, Tamara, appears on the screen. She is covering her mouth and laughing as she speaks.]

    TAMARA: Ok, I’m gonna start over because I was thinking in English

    Ok, voy a empezar de nuevo porque estaba pensando en inglés.

    TAMARA: My name is Tamara Mino, I’m a human communication major minoring in broadcast journalism.

    Mi nombre es Tamara Mino, y mi curso de estudio es en la comunicación humana, con un título adicional en el periodismo electrónico.

    [The shot shifts back to the roundtable where Knightly Latino students are in a meeting. Students are looking down and writing, while a voice-over from Katie continues.]

    KATIE: Some of them come from Latin America, and some of them are US-born, but they want to work in both markets or they want to make themselves more marketable by working in English and in Spanish.

    Algunos son de América Latina, algunos nacieron en los Estados Unidos, pero quieren aumentar sus oportunidades de empleo por medio de entrenarse tanto en Ingles como en español.

    [Katie briefly comes back on screen, before a title screen appears that reads, “Translation=Community,” “La traducción=comunidad.” Another Knightly Latino student appears on screen to discuss his experiences.]

    KNIGHTLY LATINO STUDENT: Si no que realmente estamos haciendo el trabajo que es exactamente lo que queremos hacer una vez que nos graduemos. Esto nos va permitir tener experiencia real, para que cuando salgamos podemos trabajar en un noticiero que requiera que usemos nuestras habilidades tanto en español como en inglés.

    We’re really doing the work that we want to do when we graduate. This allows us to have real experience so that when we graduate we can get jobs that require us to use our skills in both English and Spanish.

    [A title screen appears that reads, “Translation=Us,” “La traducción=nosotros. Camilla Hernandez then appears to close out the clip.]

    CAMILLA: Gracias por acompañarnos. Les habla Camilla Hernandez, de Knightly Latino.

    Thank you for joining us. This is Camilla Hernandez, from Knightly Latino.

    [A title screen reads, “Thank you Katie Coronado, Brigitte Snedeker, and all participants at Knightly Latino.”]

Translation Moments at Knightly Latino News

From Sites of Translation: What Multilinguals Can Teach Us about Digital Writing and Rhetoric by Laura Gonzales

Info

  • This video illustrates translation activities at the Knightly Latino News. The video accompanies the book, Sites of Translation: What Multilinguals Can Teach Us About Digital Writing and Rhetoric.
Creator(s)
Subjects
  • Latino Studies
  • Race and Ethnicity
  • Digital Projects
  • Cultural Studies
Date
  • 2018
Related Section
Keywords
Language
Citable Link